An Introduction to Biblical Narrative Analysis (Part 5b: Metaphor and Antithesis as Literary Devices)

An Introduction to Biblical Narrative Analysis (Part 5b: Metaphor and Antithesis as Literary Devices)

Metaphor A metaphor is “a figure of speech that makes an implicit, implied, or hidden comparison between two things that are unrelated, but which share some common characteristics. In other words, a resemblance of two contradictory or different objects is made based on a single or some common characteristics.”[1] The Bible includes many metaphors,

An Introduction to Biblical Narrative Analysis (Part 5a: Repetition as a Literary Device)

An Introduction to Biblical Narrative Analysis (Part 5a: Repetition as a Literary Device)

Repetition is the most frequently-used literary technique in Hebrew writing. As Robert Alter suggests, this is partly due to the fact that the stories compiled into Scripture were originally meant to be read aloud before the original audience.[1] Unlike a written narrative, where you can go back and review some missed points, in an oral exposition

An Introduction to Biblical Narrative Analysis (Part 2b: Indirect Characterization)

An Introduction to Biblical Narrative Analysis (Part 2b: Indirect Characterization)

Indirect characterization is achieved through various story elements such as actions, speech, relational dynamics, figures of speech, and literary techniques. Thus, Gehazi’s run after Naaman to ask for money reveals his greed, Elijah’s fleeing discloses his fear, and Cornelius’ alms-giving habits portray him as generous. Elisha’s prayer depicts him